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Sudden aggression

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  • December 12, 2017, 02:51:38 AM
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Author Topic: Sudden aggression  (Read 608 times)

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Christopher85

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Sudden aggression
« on: September 03, 2015, 05:44:27 PM »

Hello I've just joined
My CAG Harley has started becoming aggressive, he screams and looks as if he wants to leave the cage or fly to me. When I go near him or offer to let him out he refuses eye pins and goes for me. I also have a caique and she has seasonal hormonal aggression some years but she get quiet and moody whereas Harley seems to be scared and as if I'm meant to do something. He's 4yrs old and alway been friendly. Thank you in advance for any advise
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FeatherMonkey

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Re: Sudden aggression
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2015, 10:52:44 PM »

First and foremost unless you have a clear reason to doubt medical reasons a vet visit is a must. Character change falls under unusual behaviour. If weight is monitored no change recent vet check up etc.. Then...

You seem astute, 4 is hormonal between 3-6 I've read, reckon mine where about 3 and a bit when they matured. Pinning is aggressive but I tend to see it and can wait till they settle. Fear is generally a very flat bird, I actually find the feathers tell you more.

You need to identify the why, but it is slightly inconsequential. I've always trained out the problems, rather than stop them. Maybe something about your appearance has changed. You work with what they give you, so you'd train him to fly at you when you call. Just baby steps you may find you need to rebuild trust. Perhaps he's bonded with someone else in the home(hormonal you're a partner threat)? Maybe it's drama reinforced i.e. inadvertently trained.

I suspect you're kind of hoping for it to be simple it's really hard to tell on a forum it's guess work. Even then the solution won't be straight forward and far from advice but an opinion.

Disclaimer
I'm advocate for training not only for our benefit but also our birds. Also I'm not behaviourist/trainer but I have had success.

Hopefully you can find something to help, try to identify the why(maybe you caught a pin feather etc..^) train the behaviour you want, ignore what you don't.
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Christopher85

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Re: Sudden aggression
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2015, 11:56:31 PM »

Thank you for the reply
I'll book him into the vets to be sure. I've got him to come out the cage the last two evenings and he seems a bit better, I see him get agitated and I can calm him down and then he gets all affectionate. He is bonded to me. He has also started to go for me if say he wants the phone or something else I'm holding in the other hand but it's not the hardest bite more a test bite. I think he's scared and and maybe gets on edge, most parrots I've known don't want to be handled if they're unsure, and he sees my hand and thinks he's gonna be handled like a snap reaction.
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FeatherMonkey

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Re: Sudden aggression
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2015, 12:43:37 AM »

I always ask them to get up, whilst you can force them with out realising by asking them you give them control.

Sometimes I do force, but I work on the principle of the trust account something I read and use. You withdraw by forcing. Sometimes I leave them if they don't want to, safety tends to be the deciding factor.

You could just be getting tested sort of I want what you've got. Hickory did this, just remember ignore, don't reward in anyway at all. You need to teach how to share reward the behaviour you want. Over the years I see them as bossy but no need for aggressive. In a flock situation sharing with no aggression is the norm.

I tempted to say it is just a crabbie teenager testing the boundaries. Just set them by ignoring(no drama) and rewarding nice behaviour. Try to give them control sometimes they can say no. Also let them win the way you want not what they want. Only predators force prey, so imposing your will is a negative just keep the balance.

Just unusual behaviour though.

Just an IMO
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