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Parrot Toys

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Parrot Toys

Choosing Safe Parrot Toys

June 19th, 2010

You are the proud owner of a parrot and you are looking for a toy for your pet. The offer of parrot toys on the market is huge, so how do you know which parrot toy is safe for your pet? Because you should be aware that some of them are dangerous for pets as they may hurt them. Therefore, an important parrot care issue is its toys.

The first aspect you should take into consideration when buying a parrot toy is the size of the toy and the size of the pet. Basically the parrot toy should fit the size of your parrot. Why is that? Well, because a big size parrot is strong and can easily break a small toy into pieces which can be easily ingested by your pet. Therefore, try to avoid small parrot toys if your pet is big. You should know that nowadays there is a large array of big parrot toys which are made from thick plastic, perfect for a big strong-beaked parrot.

Things aren’t easy with small parrots wither. A small size parrot can be afraid of a big toy so try to fit the size of the toy to the one of the pet. If you can’t tell which parrot toy is good for your pet, look at the label or ask for more information.

Another important aspect is the type of the parrot toy. You should avoid buying parrot toys which are made out of small pieces as the parrot can remove them and, consequently digest them. Remember that a parrot has a strong beak therefore any piece which is bite-size for the parrot should not be on the toy.

A parrot toy is usually hanging on some chains. These chains can represent a possible danger for the health or life of your pet. How is this possible? Well, chains come in two types: the chains with welded links (which are safe for your parrot) and the chains with closed links (which are not safe). The parrot may try to open up the link which is not weld and its beak would get stuck in that space. The parrot may get hurt while trying to release itself. Consequently, examine carefully the chains attached to your parrot toys.

But the chains are not the only dangerous pieces of a parrot toy. Parrot toys made out of wood may also be dangerous. Therefore, wood is another important aspect to think of. Parrots are birds which love to chew wood. They do this to find bugs hidden inside the tree bark in the woods. So a parrot will always start chewing a toy made out of wood. Some types of wood are not good for parrots, so you should check the internet for a list of parrot-safe wood.

Parrots are also birds which enjoy preening and grooming. Their instinct is telling them to constantly pick or even chew their feathers. This is not a healthy habit for your pet. So you should buy a chew rope, which is a very useful parrot toy as it allows your pet to exercise its habit every day without causing any problems to itself. But pay attention to the deterioration of the toy as it gets extremely ragged and worn out. Replace it with a new toy as the clumps may cause accidents to your pet. Your parrot could catch its feet into the clumps and could get hurt while struggling to escape.

In conclusion, there is only one rule to apply for this parrot care issues: whenever shopping for a parrot toy use the common sense rule. If you look at a parrot toy and it doesn’t seem safe, don’t buy it. Don’t buy any parrot toys which can get ingested or which can get a foot or a beak caught inside them. And always examine the parrot toys carefully before putting them into your pet’s cage.

And if your parrot is ignoring its new, shiny toy, don’t worry. It doesn’t hate it, it is just being cautious. Parrots don’t like change, like most pets. And a new toy represents an unexpected change for their habitat. Therefore, the toy must be put under strict observation to make sure it is not a possible enemy. After two or three weeks of monitoring the intruder (the toy) the parrot will gain confidence into its new toy and it will start playing with it!


About the Author

www.kokkada.com


Keeping Your Parrot Happy with Safe Parrot Toys

June 19th, 2010

You are the proud owner of a parrot and you are looking for a toy for your pet. The offer of parrot toys on the market is huge, so how do you know which parrot toy is safe for your pet? Because you should be aware that some of them are dangerous for pets as they may hurt them. Therefore, an important parrot care issue is its toys.

The first aspect you should take into consideration when buying a parrot toy is the size of the toy and the size of the pet. Basically the parrot toy should fit the size of your parrot. Why is that? Well, because a big size parrot is strong and can easily break a small toy into pieces which can be easily ingested by your pet. Therefore, try to avoid small parrot toys if your pet is big. You should know that nowadays there is a large array of big parrot toys which are made from thick plastic, perfect for a big strong-beaked parrot.

Keeping Your Parrot Happy with Safe Parrot Toys

Things arn’t easy with small parrots either. A small size parrot can be afraid of a big toy so try to fit the size of the toy to the one of the pet. If you can’t tell which parrot toy is good for your pet, look at the label or ask for more information.

Another important aspect is the type of the parrot toy. You should avoid buying parrot toys which are made out of small pieces as the parrot can remove them and, consequently digest them. Remember that a parrot has a strong beak therefore any piece which is bite-size for the parrot should not be on the toy.

A parrot toy is usually hanging on some chains. These chains can represent a possible danger for the health or life of your pet. How is this possible? Well, chains come in two types: the chains with welded links (which are safe for your parrot) and the chains with closed links (which are not safe). The parrot may try to open up the link which is not weld and its beak would get stuck in that space. The parrot may get hurt while trying to release itself. Consequently, examine carefully the chains attached to your parrot toys.

But the chains are not the only dangerous pieces of a parrot toy. Parrot toys made out of wood may also be dangerous. Therefore, wood is another important aspect to think of. Parrots are birds which love to chew wood. They do this to find bugs hidden inside the tree bark in the woods. So a parrot will always start chewing a toy made out of wood. Some types of wood are not good for parrots, so you should check the internet for a list of parrot-safe wood.

Parrots are also birds which enjoy preening and grooming. Their instinct is telling them to constantly pick or even chew their feathers. This is not a healthy habit for your pet. So you should buy a chew rope, which is a very useful parrot toy as it allows your pet to exercise its habit every day without causing any problems to itself. But pay attention to the deterioration of the toy as it gets extremely ragged and worn out. Replace it with a new toy as the clumps may cause accidents to your pet. Your parrot could catch its feet into the clumps and could get hurt while struggling to escape.

Keeping Your Parrot Happy with Safe Parrot Toys

In conclusion, there is only one rule to apply for this parrot care issues: whenever shopping for a parrot toy use the common sense rule. If you look at a parrot toy and it doesn’t seem safe, don’t buy it. Don’t buy any parrot toys which can get ingested or which can get a foot or a beak caught inside them. And always examine the parrot toys carefully before putting them into your pet’s cage.

And if your parrot is ignoring its new, shiny toy, don’t worry. It doesn’t hate it, it is just being cautious. Parrots don’t like change, like most pets. And a new toy represents an unexpected change for their habitat. Therefore, the toy must be put under strict observation to make sure it is not a possible enemy. After two or three weeks of monitoring the intruder (the toy) the parrot will gain confidence into its new toy and it will start playing with it!

If you have a parrot and you want to know all the parrot care secrets that you need too keep him happy and healthy then you have to join us at the parrot care information center. You will find out useful things about parrot food, parrot health, parrot breeding and best parrot toys suggestions.


About the Author

Article written by Ispas Marin other articles written by Ispas Marin can be found here http://www.ezinearticles.com/?expert=Ispas_Marin


Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys

June 19th, 2010

We love to give our birds toys, they are intelligent, curious creatures, add a toy to their cage, and they will amuse and delight us. Toys keep them happy and involved. Behaviorists often advise owners with a bird who plucks his feathers to make sure they give their pet plenty of toys and rotate them regularly to prevent boredom. Wooden toys can keep beaks trimmed and prevent your favorite dining room chair from becoming the chew toy of choice. However, many toys contain hidden dangers. If these toys are used improperly or without appropriate supervision, they can cause injuries and even kill your pet birds.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Bird Safe Or Veterinarian Approved?

If a toy’s label says it is safe and approved by bird experts, it must be absolutely safe. Right? Wrong. Many toys with these labels have proven to be dangerous. The number one issue seems to be picking a toy that is appropriate for your bird’s size. Chain toys can be extremely dangerous if the links are large enough for a bird’s head. A trapped bird will quickly panic. Toys with hanging ropes and strings can easily become nooses for birds. They should be trimmed short so they cannot get their head in any length of rope. Loose strings on rope toys and rope perches can also entrap a bird’s foot. A panicking bird will go as far as to chew off its own toes to free itself from this trap. One of the solutions is to allow your bird to use these risky toys only while you can supervise their play.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Fabric

Happy Huts or other fabric-covered sleep tents for birds are generally quite safe. However, some birds develop a taste for this fabric and will eat the fuzzy coverings. If fluff appears to be disappearing from your Happy Hut, remove it. This material can cause obstructions and death. On necropsy, such birds have been found to have large amounts of the fluffy material in their digestive tract.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Clips And Fasteners

The clip used to attach a toy to the bird’s cage can also cause problems. Make sure the clip contains no zinc. It is also advisable to replace lanyard clips with quick link type connectors. The latter are more difficult for a bird to open. Lanyard clips can get trapped on a small bird’s beak. Larger birds can loosen “S” hooks that have been pinched shut with pliers. They can get their beaks caught in them. While this might not seem that dangerous, a panicking bird can seriously injure itself and severely damage its beak.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Fruity Wood

Fruit-flavored blocks of wood have become very popular toys. Be sure that your bird is merely chewing these toys and not ingesting the wood. The fruit flavoring may encourage them to actually swallow the wood pieces, which may be too sharp for the digestive tract and cause perforations.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Size Matters

It is important to emphasize that the size of the bird often determines which toys are appropriate. If you give an amazon parrot a toy intended for a cockatiel, the amazon could end up swallowing the small parts. Certain plastic toys will be easily broken by the large beaks of cockatoos and macaws, which could result in damage to their gizzard or digestive tract if they swallow the broken bits.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Beware Of PVC

Consumers have also become aware recently of the dangers of PVC in toys. Toy companies have discontinued many baby toys that use polyvinyl chloride. If you have bought children’s toys for your birds, make sure they do not contain PVC.

Pros And Cons Surrounding Parrot Toys : Monitor Your Bird

The best way to gauge a toy’s level of safety is to monitor your bird with the toy for the first few days. Remove the toy when you go out and put it back in the cage when you are home. With certain toys, it is best to always remove them when you are not supervising the bird. Use common sense when deciding which toys are safe for your pet, and if you have any doubts about a toy’s safety, remove it immediately. If your bird ever does have an incident in which he is injured while playing with a toy, it is important to document the injury and notify the manufacturer. Bird toy companies have proliferated with the rising popularity of birds as pets. Many of these companies need feedback on which of their toys could pose a danger to companion birds.


About the Author

This article is courtesy of www.parrotparrot.com


Make Your Own Parrot Toys To Keep Your Parrot Happy

June 19th, 2010

A parrot with toys is a happy bird! Birds need to be taught to entertain themselves. A good place to start is with toys. Toys can help in keeping their beak nice and trim but also aid in preventing behavioral issues such as screaming, biting, and plucking. Toy-making can be relaxing and also can be quality time spent with your flock while making their toys. Let them be your guide. Knowing your bird is a big part of it. Analyzing what their likes and dislikes are. My birds like excitement in their toys!! Makes toy making for me all the merrier.

It is always good to rotate your toys periodically. Rotating toys every other week will help pattern your bird to readily accept new toys without fear, and helps them to retain interest in toys that were stored. Keep an eye on toys and check them daily to ensure they are in tact, safely attached to the cage and no loose parts. When giving your bird a new toy, watch to see if he/she is chewing or eating the toys. Remove the toy if your bird is eating the parts. Watch for the fraying of material or rope and cut it back immediately. Your bird could get entangled (leg, wing, or their toe). Close supervision is always highly recommended.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Playbox

Utilizing a spare Food Cup that affixes to the side of the cage (near a perch or on the bottom), fill the toy box with toy parts. Wood toy parts (rings, spools, shapes, blocks, etc), small strands of bird safe vegetable tanned leather and cotton rope, marbella beads and rings. Remember to use the right size toy part for your bird. Never give a Parakeet toy part to a Macaw or an African Grey and visa versa.

I can not express enough the enjoyment my flock has with their toy box. Oliver, my eldest Grey, had the attention span of about 10 seconds. He literally spends **hours** playing in his toy box. He takes two parts at a time and tries to fit one inside the other. This also aided in keeping his mind occupied pro-actively and made time spent in his cage more enjoyable.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Toy Parts (wood/acrylic)

Who knows their birds best? You do! You are their moms and dads. You are closest to them and know their likes and dislikes.

Always be sure to purchase bird safe products. Never using painted or lacquered wood parts (certain paints/lacquers contain zinc and other harmful chemicals/additives). A helpful tip would be to order a few items if you are not sure your bird companion would enjoy it as much as we would like them to.

It is my opinion, dyed toy parts are more for humans than it is for birds. However, birds that are already accustomed to colored toy parts may need more “convincing’ but can be patterned to like the undyed toy parts easily. Dye free toys are a natural stimulus to birds and are readily accepted by birds. It is my experience, that phobic/inhibited birds shy away from colored toys. You can save yourself a lot of time and energy by not coloring wooden parts. Please take note when your bird is chewing dyed wood, some of it may be ingested. Warning: Never use flavorings to color your toys. This will encourage them to eat the wood parts.

Some safe woods are: Pine, Maple, Apple, Arbutus, Aspen, Beech, Birch, Cactus, Cottonwood, Crabapple, Dogwood, Elm, Hawthorn, Larch, Manzanita, Ash, Poplar, Willow, Ribbonwood, Grapevine wood. Warning: Never use pressure treated woods or Oak.

Helpful Tip: Popsicle Sticks can be purchased at Craft Stores. They are very handy easy toys and can be used to distract your bird. For small to medium sized birds only.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Vegetable Tanned Leather

Shop around and find a place that has the right type of leather. There are various widths and thickness of vegetable tanned leather strips. Be sure to purchase what is most suitable for your bird and the size of the hole that is drilled. Be sure it is bird safe leather and not treated with any chemicals or dyes.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : 100% Cotton Rope

There are several different types of rope. Two popular types are solid braided rope and twisted rope. Some are harder to find than others. Some birds enjoy unraveling the rope, then they can preen it. Be sure all the frayed ends are trimmed so that your bird does not get caught. Warning: Unraveled rope poses as a serious threat to birds. As the rope frays it becomes a trap for your bird. Ensure the rope is 100% cotton. Any alternatives are not considered bird safe.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Cotton Material

100% Cotton Material can be cut into short strips and tied onto toys to encourage preening. Colored material can be purchased and using a Pinking Shear will discourage fraying but always be sure to trim the frayed ends back daily.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Toy Attachments

Quick links are the most common form of attaching toys. Parrots are naturally inquisitive, always be sure to check that Quick Links are always secured tightly to the cages. Some folks like to utilize leather strips and cotton rope to affix toys to cages and playstands. With my flock, I am in the habit of attaching toys half in and outside the cage. This way if they happen to be on top their cage playing they have toys inside and out (two toys in one). Remember: stainless steel is the best method and is zinc free. Brass and some quick links contain zinc. Be sure to ask for stainless steel to ensure they are bird-safe.

Not Recommended: Key Chain Rings, Clips. Birds can get their beaks and/or talon nails caught in them.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Chains

Chains come in various sizes and metals. Same as quick links. They come in various sizes. Always buy the right size for your bird. Too large or too small can be harmful. Be wary of chains made of brass or zinc. Zinc poses a serious threat to birds. Stainless steel is zinc free.

Make Your Own Parrot Toys : Sisal Rope/Jute

Similar to cotton rope, sisal rope comes in various widths. Be sure to know your source when purchasing it. Some places that sell Sisal/Jute may apply chemicals and/or harmful oils in the processing. Take note if the rope has a smell to it, it may be harmful to your avian companion.

Things to avoid: Colored Magazines and Colored Newspapers, Felt, Toothbrushes, Cardboard, Toilet Paper and, Paper Towel Cardboard Tubes, Plastic Bags, Cellophane and Plastic Coated Wires. For a more in depth look at toy safety, read our Toys Frequently Asked Questions article.

Colored magazines contain harmful inks and chemicals, when ingested can cause harm. Cardboard and Cardboard Tubes contain harmful glues which contain Zinc. Toothbrushes contain nylon fibers and some contain lead metal parts to hold the bristles in place. Plastic Bags, Felt and Cellophane can be ingested and will not pass through bird’s digestive system. It may cause a blockage and much harm to your feathered loved one.

Now the fun begins… assembling them. Be creative, let your flock be your guide. If your bird loves toys with dangling parts ~ make an octopus toy. If your bird loves thin wood parts, be sure to try 3/16″ thick toy parts and measure what the proper width should be. I have found that for medium sized birds (Greys to small Cockatoos) the best width of rope is 3/16″, it is easily made into knots and threading through holes. If your bird happens to love the color pink, buy some pink marbella beads to encourage him to play with it. If your bird is a bit phobic, make simple toys that have only one long string with simple parts hanging on it with knots to separate in between. Dye is not needed to attract a bird, you can accent a toy with high impact plastics like marbella or other acrylic parts.

You can also make some fun talon toys. My birds LOVE to climb around the cage with a talon toy in their beak.

Toy Tips for birds with behavioral issues: Toys can be a great distraction for birds who are bored. Take a sheet of plain white paper and a small piece of cotton rope or jute. Tie the rope around the paper and let your bird shred it. Another tip would be to thread “Leafy Green Vegetables” through the bars. Nutrition and Toy in one! Read our Foraging Toys Article for more tips. Sometimes simplicity in a toy can be fun for your bird. Take a piece of cotton rope, jute or Vegetable Tanned Leather ~ tie knots in it every 1.5 inches. This can be a toy for when you sit with your bird or in the cage. I have met some pretty great Houdini’s with undoing the knots! Food for Thought: A bird interested in toys will be less likely to pluck or pick at their feathers.

Let your bird sit with you while you are making the toys. They will get extremely curious of what you are doing. Allow them to wander through the pools of toy parts (of course making sure there isn’t anything dangerous nearby like scissors, needles, plastic wrappers, etc). This will encourage them to explore the toy once it is complete and placed in their cage. P.S. Be cautious of what your birds may get into when toy-making. They are always getting their little talons into something 🙂 As you can see from the photo to the right.

More importantly, have fun with it. I find my flock helps me relax and release up some of those built up energies of day-to-day life.


About the Author

www.parrots-i.com


Foraging Toys

May 2nd, 2010

Zachie The Grey  Eating Greens

Diet plays a major role in a parrot’s life. Diet promotes good behavior, health and longevity! Here are some fun food toys to offer your bird which may even tempt the finicky birds who need to be on the road to better health!

Foraging Toys: Pouch Surprise

Take a washed, large leafy green (i.e. Kale, Mustard Greens, Beet Greens) and take some leftover Brown Rice (brown rice is more nutritional than white rice) and pour it into the center of the leaf. You can add some Cranberries, Sprouts, Raisins, or Blueberries. Try not to over fill the leaf. Grab all the ends of the leaf and tie them together to form a pouch. If you would prefer to make a veggie or fruit mash: Take some of their favorites and throw them in the food processor and use that in your Pouch Surprise! Use something that you know they love and can smell. Some birds like a whiff of cinnamon or the smell of parsley. Our flock seems to enjoy fresh garlic. Take about a foot of 100% Natural Cotton Rope and tie a knot and make a loop at the end to affix it in the inside of your bird’s cage. Vegetable tanned leather strips can also be used to string up the Pouch Surprise. Note: Keep the rope very trim so your bird cannot get caught in the dangling rope strands and knotted tightly. They will be very curious of this new fun and healthy toy you placed in there and will rip apart the leaf and find the little surprises you have tucked within.

Foraging Toys: Weaving

If you are having trouble getting your bird to try some of those high vitamin items you desperately want them to eat. Try taking them and weaving them through the bars of your bird’s cage. Start with a small leaf if your bird is afraid of new items within their cage domain. Perhaps washed Carrot Tops, Beet or Dandelion Greens would be a wonderful place to start.. Remember to be enthusiastic about these items. Parrots are very curious by instinct and will wonder what “all the fuss” is about. Before you know it, he will be ripping apart the leaves. The first step on the road to better eating is forming a taste for it. By ripping apart the leaves, your bird will be ingesting some of the nutrients. My flock loves to rub their feathers on the freshly washed leaves then tear it to shreds! You will see your bird will enjoy eating the stems of the leafy greens which is where most of the nutrients are!

Foraging Toys: Pick-Up Stix

I remember playing Pick-Up Stix as a youngster. Well this fun foraging game can be just as much fun for your avian companion!

Take some carrots, kohlrabi, beets – whatever you can find and cut them into long sticks. (Maybe 1/2 the size of a Chop Stick in length.) Here is where the fun begins. Just you and your avian companion at the kitchen table or counter. My flock loves to be on the counter and play with food items. Note: Remove all objects from the area so that nothing is around to “distract” those curious beaks. This will keep them focused. (for a moment or two at least). Start placing the “veggie stix” out and making a pile out of them. Watch your bird come over and pick up the sticks along with you. He may throw them off the counter – be warned! Put some newspaper down to catch whatever may go falling down.

Our greatest challenge as parents to these wonderful feathered creatures is constantly finding new and exciting way to keep them interested and intrigued. No doubt you will come up with your own ideas for your and your pet bird.

Note: There are many foraging toys on the market today which help to hide treats and make life more interesting for you and your avian companion. Feel free to visit Grey Feather Toy Creations to see our new line of Stainless Steel Foraging Toys.

About the Author

This article was written by It’s a Grey’s World


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