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So You Want A Grey – Are You Sure?

January 13th, 2011

Just wanted to put a few thoughts down for anybody that is looking around trying to decide whether to buy an African Grey or not.  If you can TRUTHFULLY answer yes to these questions then go ahead and look for the Grey of your dreams.  If there is one TRUTHFUL “No” amongst your answers then do a bit more research, ask a few more questions and then try again.

African Grey

1.  Are you prepared to have a permanent toddler in your home for the next 50+ years?  

2.  Parrots make a mess, an endless mess on walls, floors even ceilings!  Can you cope with mess?

3.  Noise.  Parrots make a noise, they scream, whistle, shout make the same noise over and over and over again until it could drive you insane.  Are you prepared for perpetual noise?

4.  Cost. Parrots cost a fortune, not just the initial outlay but ongoing, toys (parrots destroy toys, that’s on their job description) food, the best food is pellets which can be expensive, around £30 every six weeks for one parrot. Plus of course all the other things, veg, fruit, pulses, vet bills, insurance, carry cage.

5.  Space.  Do you really have the space for a parrot?  I mean….REALLY have the space, don’t just say “Yeah, it will fit in that corner over there!”  they should have a big cage, the bigger the better, then they like to fly around as well, out of cage time means they need space to play, space to have toys out and play, space to just be a parrot.

6.  Do you want a parrot that can talk?  If you answer yes to this one, what about if it doesn’t talk?  What if all it did in the way of noise was to imitate your microwave all day, shout and scream at it’s toys, didn’t want to talk to you at all…..would you still love it?

7.  Are you prepared for your parrot to not like you?  Greys are like people, they have their likes and dislikes, maybe you like the parrot, but what if it doesn’t like you?  What if it loves your partner?  Would you still want it?

8.  Holidays. Can you make arrangements for your parrot to be looked after properly when you have to go away?  

9.  Time.  Do you really have time to look after a parrot?  They need an awful lot of attention, just like a child, they like to play and interact with people.  They are not an ornament to be kept in a cage 24/7 with food and water added so that it eases your conscience.

10.  Other pets.  Do you have other pets, a cat or a dog?  Do you have the space to let the parrot out and shut away your cat or dog while the parrot plays for an hour or two?  Do you have the time to dedicate to each of your pets?

11.  If you have answered yes to all of the above questions, then ok, you might be ready to have a parrot, but if there is the slightest doubt in your mind, stop and think it over again.  Do you really want a parrot to love and care for, probably for the rest of your life, or do you just see other parrots sitting, talking, playing and you think you want one like that?

There are far too many parrots on the rehoming roundabout, people buy them with all the best intentions and then the novelty wears off, or they come up with an excuse to pass them on.  Sometimes of course it is inevitable that a parrot has to find a new home, but I firmly believe that most obstacles are surmountable and usually with a bit of compromise here and there, there is no need for rehoming. Would you get rid of your child because the novelty wears off, it makes a noise, it’s expensive, it makes a mess, you have to make arrangements for holidays?

Just think over and over again, do you really want this sort of committment.

Written by Pat (Plukie –  Moderator on the forum)


Parrot Pellet Comparison Made Easy!

October 1st, 2010

Recommended Pellets

The ingredients:

Harrisons High Potency: Ground Shelled Sunflower Seeds, Ground Hulless Barley, Ground Soybeans, Ground Shelled Peanuts, Ground Green Peas, Ground Lentils, Ground Yellow Corn, Ground Rice, Ground Toasted Oat Groats, Psyllium, Sun Dried Alfalfa, Calcium Carbonate, Spirulina, Montmorillonite Clay, Ground Dried Sea Kelp, Vitamin E Supplement, Sea Salt, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, d-Biotin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Sodium Selenite. CERTIFIED ORGANIC INGREDIENT

Crude protein (min.) 18%, crude fat (min.) 15%, crude fiber (max.) 6.5%, moisture (max.) 10%

Harrisons Lifetime: Ground Yellow Corn, Ground Hulless Barley, Ground Soybeans, Ground Shelled Peanuts, Ground Shelled Sunflower Seeds, Ground Lentils, Ground Green Peas, Ground Rice, Ground Toasted Oat Groats, Sun Dried Alfalfa, Calcium Carbonate, Psyllium, Montmorillonite Clay, Spirulina, Ground Dried Sea Kelp, Vitamin E Supplement, Sea Salt , Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, d-Biotin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Sodium Selenite. CERTIFIED ORGANIC INGREDIENT

Crude protein (min.) 15%, crude fat (min.) 5.5%, crude fiber (max.) 6.5%, moisture (max.) 10%

Zupreem Natural: Ground corn, Soybean meal, Ground wheat, Vegetable oil, Wheat germ meal, Sucrose, Dicalcium phosphate, Calcium carbonate, Ground vegetables (carrots, celery, beets, watercress and spinach), Iodized salt, DL-Methionine, Choline chloride, L-Lysine, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate, Natural mixed tocopherols, Rosemary extract, Citric acid, Canthaxanthin, Manganous oxide, Zinc oxide, Copper sulfate, Calcium iodate, Sodium selenite, Vitamin A supplement, Vitamin D3 supplement, Vitamin E supplement, Vitamin K supplement, Niacin, Calcium pantothenate, Pyridoxine hydrochloride, Thiamine,
Riboflavin, Folic acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 supplement.

Protein – 14%
Fat – 4%
Fibre – 3.5%
Moisture – 10%

Zupreem FruitBlend: Ground corn, Soybean meal, Ground wheat, Vegetable oil, Wheat germ meal, Sucrose, Dicalcium phosphate, Calcium carbonate, Ground fruit (bananas, oranges, apples and grapes), Iodized salt, DL-Methionine, Choline chloride, L-Lysine, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate, Natural mixed tocopherols, Rosemary extract, Citric acid, Natural and artificial colors, Artificial flavors, Canthaxanthin, Manganous oxide, Zinc oxide, Copper sulfate, Calcium iodate, Sodium selenite, Vitamin A supplement, Vitamin D3 supplement, Vitamin E supplement, Vitamin K supplement, Niacin, Calcium pantothenate, Pyridoxine hydrochloride, Thiamine, Riboflavin, Folic acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 supplement.
Protein – 14%
Fat – 4%
Fibre – 3.5%
Moisture – 10%

Hagen: Fruits – Orange oil, banana oil (for flavour) – Seeds – Corn, wheat, rice, sunflower kernal, flaxseed, oat groats – Vegetables – Tomato – Legumes – Soybean, peanut kernal – Others – Spirulina, rosemary extract, vitamins and minerals
Protein – 14.0% – Fat – 9.0% – Fibre – 4.0%

Totally Organics Pellets: Certified Organic Ingredients: Rice, hulled millet, barley, alfalfa leaf, sunflower seed hulled, sesame seeds unhulled, quinoa whole, buckwheat hulled, dandelion leaf powder, carrot powder, spinach leaf powder, purple dulse, kelp, rose hips powder, rose hips crushed, orange peel powder, lemon peel powder, rosemary whole leaf, cayenne ground, crushed red chili peppers, nettle leaf.

Guaranteed Analysis: Protein 15% Max., Fat 6% Min., Crude Fiber 6% Max.

Roudybush Maintenance Crumble:  Ground Corn, Ground Wheat, Peanut Meal, Soy Oil, Soy Meal, Hydrated Sodium Calcium Aluminosilicate, Yucca schidigen Extract, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, L-Lysine, DL-Methionine, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Ascorbic Acid, Citric Acid, Lecithin, Silicon Dioxide (carrier for liquid antioxidants), Sodium Selenite (on Calcium Carbonate), Niacin, Alpha-Tocopherol Acetate (Source of Vitamin E), Biotin, Manganese Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Zinc Oxide, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vit. A Acetate, Thiamine, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (Vit K), Cyanocobalamin (VitB12), Vit D3 Sup. Folic Acid, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Propionic Acid, Ammonium Hydroxide, Acetic Acid, Sorbic Acid, Tartaric Acid, and natural apple flavoring.

Guaranteed Maintenance analysis: crude protein min. 11.0%; crude fiber max. 3.5%; crude fat min. 7.0%

Not Recommended

Kaytee Exact Rainbow: Ground Corn, Ground Wheat, Ground Oat Groats, Soybean Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Wheat Middlings, Ground Flax Seed, Soy Oil, Dried Whole Egg, Dried Beet Pulp, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Wheat Germ Meal, Corn Sugar, L-Lysine, Salt, Whole Cell Algae Meal (source of DHA), Fructooligosaccharide, Brewers Dried Yeast, Vitamin A Supplement, Choline Chloride, Dried Cane Molasses, Titanium Dioxide, Mixed Tocopherols (a preservative), Yeast Extract, DL-Methionine, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (source of vitamin K activity), Niacin, Rosemary Extract, Citric Acid, Calcium Pantothenate, L-Carnitine, Copper Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Cholecalciferol (source of vitamin D3), Beta-Carotene, Canthaxanthin, Folic Acid, Calcium Iodate, Biotin, Cobalt Carbonate, Sodium Selenite, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Artificial Colors, Natural Flavors.

Pretty Bird For African Greys: Ground Corn, Ground Oats, Corn Gluten Meal, Ground Wheat, Coconut Oil, Canola Oil, Soya Oil, Olive Oil, Safflower Oil, Corn Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Dicalcium Phosphate, L-Lysine Monohydrochloride, Choline Chloride, Natural and Artificial Flavors DL Methionine, Vitamin E Supplement, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Ferric Sulfate, D-Biotin, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Zinc Oxide, Manganese Oxide, Niacinamide, Vitamin B12 Supplement, BHT (As a Preservative), Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Beta Carotene, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Natural and Artificial Colors, Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol Bisulfite (Source of Vitamin K3), Vitamin D3 Supplement, Cobalt Sulfate

Pretty Bird For Small Birds: Ground Corn, Ground Wheat, Ground Oat Groats, Corn Gluten Meal, Potato Protein, Coconut Oil, Soya Oil, Safflower Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Dicalcuim Phosphate, L-Lysine, Monohydrochloride, Choline Chloride, Natural and Artificial Flavors, DL-Methionine, Vitamin E Supplement, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Ferric Sulfate, D-Biotin, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Zinc Oxide, Manganese Oxide, Niacinamide, Vitamin B12 Supplement, BHT (as a preservative), Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Beta-Carotene, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Natural and Artificial Colours, Menadione Dimethylpyrimdinol Bisulfite Complex (source of vitamin K3), Vitamin D3 Supplement, Cobalt Sulfate

Note the ingredient list is almost exactly the same on both Pretty Bird products, so the label on the packaging suggesting the species of the the parrots it is formulated for is just that, a label, and a meaningless one too.

In red I highlighted the ingredients which are best avoided.

Salt. In minute quantities it is probably harmless, up the amount a bit and it can cause serious toxicity and even death (amount added to pellets is strictly regulated of course)

Sugar (Sucrose). Promotes yeast and bacteria growth in the gut. Excessive amount can lead to diabetes.

Corn Gluten Meal – is a byproduct of corn (maize) processing that has historically been used as an animal feed. It can also be used as an organic herbicide. CGM is used as an inexpensive protein source for pet foods. However, many dogs and cats develop an allergy to corn after eating CGM for an extended amount of time. (from Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_gluten_meal )

Menadione – Large doses of menadione have been reported to cause adverse outcomes including hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency, neonatal brain or liver damage, or neonatal death in some rare cases. Moreover, menadione supplements have been banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because of their potential toxicity… (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menadione)

BHT – “BHT could produce hyperactivity in some children. In addition, some controversy surrounds the link of BHT to cancer risk, some studies showing the potential to increase and some showing a decrease in risk. Some food industries have voluntarily eliminated this additive from their products, and since the 1970s it has been steadily replaced with the less studied BHA. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butylated_hydroxytoluene)

Natural Flavours. Even though they are called natural, they are not in fact that natural. Many foods and drinks are flavoured by ‘natural flavours’ or ‘natural flavourings’. These are obtained from plants, meat, fish, fungi and even wood. But they’re a very concentrated chemical extract from natural sources – not the real thing.
Natural flavourings don’t have to come from the plant or animal you might expect. For example, strawberry flavour products can contain natural flavourings that have never been close to a real, natural strawberry.
They have been made in a laboratory and are so chemically similar to real strawberry extract that they are allowed to be called natural. They are sometimes described as ‘nature identical’.
There’s an easy way to tell if a food or drink contains real ingredients. Take a look at the ingredients list. If it shows a lot of colourings and flavourings, there’s a good chance that the manufacturer cut back on real ingredients. (Source: http://www.chewonthis.org.uk/factory_food/additives_home.htm#natural-flavours )

In green I highlighted the ingredients which I am happy to see on the label (they are less conventional ingredient and added to go along with regular seeds/grains/legumes standard for this type of feed)

So in theory, the more red ingredients there are the worse the pellet.

Written By Irina of  http://parrotcomforts.co.uk


All The Facts About The African Grey Parrot

July 31st, 2010

The African grey parrot is one of the most popular pet parrots available. Many people get the name of the parrot wrong and in fact spell African grey parrot as ‘African gray parrot’. This is indeed wrong but if you made a mistake then don’t worry about it! This article will endeavor to explain everything there is to know about the African grey parrot or the African gray parrot!

All The Facts About The African Grey Parrot: What Do They Look Like?

As you would have probably guessed already, the African grey parrot is mostly grey all over with a shade of grey around the facial region. Their beaks are generally black and they have a tinge of red underlying beneath their tails that help them to stand out from many other grey parrots. They come from the Congo region in Africa and are constantly hunters by traffickers due to the fact that they can sell for quite a lot of money in Western parts of the world.

Efforts are being made to stop this from occurring and in recent history there seems to be a reduction in the number of birds being trafficked overseas. This has also sparked a revival in their overall numbers in the wild which means things are starting to look up for the African grey.

All The Facts About The African Grey Parrot: What Are They Like To Train?

African grey parrots are one of the most brilliant breeds on Earth and are said to be one of the best speakers out of all the parrots. They have the ability to put together whole phrases and can actually learn quite fast. This is one of the major reasons why so many parrot owners choose to own African grays.

All The Facts About The African Grey Parrot: Is There Anything I Should Know Before I decide To Buy An African Grey Parrot?

Yes actually there is a lot you need to learn before you going out and buy your own. First of all you have to make sure you know where you are getting your parrot from as many of them are trafficked into the country as was discussed previously in the article. Secondly if you have no experience whatsoever in parrot handling, I would recommend starting off with a bird that is much easier to handle such as a budgie for example.

Lastly African grey parrots are animals that thrive on enthusiasm and attention. If you know you aren’t going to be able to spend enough time looking after and training your parrot then do the right thing and let someone who does have a go. There are too many people out there abusing the privilege of owning such magnificent creatures just so they can tell their friends that they own a parrot. I’m not trying to put you off buying one, all I’m saying is that you need to sum up your life and make sure there is room for an African grey parrot in it and if there is, I hope you enjoy many years of great success and happiness with your parrot!



About the Author

By: Dane Stanton of www.parrottrainingreview.com


Quaker Parrots: All The Amazing Secrets

July 31st, 2010

The Quaker Parrot is more formally known as the Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) and is native to the temperate areas of Brazil, and Argentina. They average a twenty nine centimeter length with a forty eight centimeter wingspan and an average weight of one hundred grams with females usually 10%-20% smaller than there male counterparts.

Quaker Parrots are usually bright green with a grey to white breast. Its flight feathers are a brilliant dark blue that are very contrasted by its green upper body. They have a curved orange beak which is very common among parrots.

Quaker parrots are very intelligent birds. Like most parrots Quaker Parrots are able to ‘imitate’ human speech and when kept as pets they will often times develop very large vocabularies.

The Quaker Parrot was introduced to the United States from South America in the late 1960’s to be sold as pets, many of these escaped into the wild or were purposefully released by bored pet owners. By the year 1995 it had colonized 15 states and holds a population in Florida believed to be 100,000 birds. Some debate, primarily in the United States, that feral Quaker parrots and harmful to crops and resident species, this however is an ongoing debate with few conclusive answers. If damage did occur it would most likely be light.

Because of there intelligence and rather small stature Quaker Parrots make great small cage pets. They are also very popular as pets so more than likely your local pet store will have some for a reasonable price.

Some interesting facts about Quaker Parrots:

  • Quaker parrots are very social sometimes building colonies with one large nest. These nests can reach the size of a small car and are made almost entirely of sticks.
  • Quaker parrot colonies have been found as far north as New York City, Chicago, and Rhode Island, but are usually isolated to the urban enclaves of these areas.
  • The Quaker Parrot Lifespan is 15-30 years respectively, some say 15-25 years while others say 20-30 years, it’s a wonder if a standard lifespan will ever be named.
  • Due to the spread of the feral populations of Quaker parrots through the spread of demand for them as pets, they can now be found wild in Europe, Bermuda, Puerto Rico, Canary Islands and Japan.
  • The Quaker Parrot is the only parrot that builds its nest out of sticks on tree or human structures instead of a hole in a tree.

About the Author

If you want to know more about everything parrots including free information, course reviews and much, much more, then please visit ParrotTrainingReview.com (Reccommended) or for more free articles all about parrots visit Parrots.


Untold Secrets of Parrot Adoption

July 31st, 2010

Parrot adoption, like all forms of adoption, is an essential service needed for parrots that need a good home. Sometimes parrots are put for adoption simply because the previous owners are unable to care for them any more be it financially or simply an issue of time to nurture the parrot.

Occasionally though the reason a parrot is put up for adoption can be more malice. There is always those select few pet owners who miss treat or neglect there pets. Like those who buy pit bulls and train them, through abuse and starvation, to be aggressive toward everyone and everything. Parrots to, occasionally are mistreated, usually through poor living conditions. These animals need the people who work for adoption service to find them a good home where they will be treated well.

Today, parrot adoption centers are connected to prospective adopters through the internet. Many of the centers have very lengthy websites containing all sorts of valuble information including detailed information about parrots as well as a list of parrots they offer for adoption.

Parrot adoption organizations are usually not for profit. Parrot adoption centers are usually formed out of the need of a certain geographic area that may have a high number of mistreated parrots, or parrots whose owners simply can’t care for them any more. Thus making parrot adoption centers not only crucial in the general well being of parrots but also helps keep down the number of that are released into the wild.

Untold Secrets of Parrot Adoption : Helpful Parrot Adoption Organizations

Feathered Friends Forever Rescue/Refuge is a nonprofit avian rescue/refuge that offers a adoptions and other valuable avian adoption resources. They were established in 1998 and are known as one of the best places to find parrots for adoption.

Parrot Education and Adoption Center (PEAC) is an adoption center ran out of San Diego, CA in the United States but also has chapters in Chicago, IL, Anchorage, AK, Cleveland, OH, and Pittsburgh, PA. They are not for profit and will accept unwanted or found parrots where they will care for them until a qualified applicant is found.

Parrot Chronicles is an online magazine for parrot lovers. It offers a wide range of information from species information to pet owner stories to medical answers for parrots and include a list of adoption centers sorted by countries and states. The are known as being the premier magazine for for everything parrots.

There is of course a lot more Parrot adoption and rescue centers out there, but they are all striving for one goal, the safety and well being of all parrots alike.


About the Author

If you want to know more about everything parrots including free information, course reviews and much, much more, then please visit ParrotTrainingReview.com (Reccommended) or for more free articles all about parrots visit Parrots.


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